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Impact of Climate Change on UK Plants and Trees
New Study released by University of Cambridge

The study focused on 293 species, and used historical data recorded over 250 years to understand the affects of warmer climates on flowering times and colonisation areas.

In this non-urban woodland is a high structure horizontal and vertical diversity. This means habitat diversity.
Arie Koster
In this non-urban woodland is a high structure horizontal and vertical diversity. This means habitat diversity.
The University of Cambridge have published a study analysing the influence of climate change on plants and trees across the UK. The study focused on 293 species, and used historical data recorded over 250 years to understand the affects of warmer climates on flowering times and colonisation areas. 

The study shows the changing temperatures in the UK have a greater impact on annual species, while perennial species adapt more slowly to the change. Dr Kate Lewthwaite, Nature’s Calendar project manager, said: “For plants to survive as the climate changes it is crucial that we conserve and restore our natural habitats to make it easier for plants to disperse between them.” 

38 perennial species have not responded to changes in climate through flowering earlier or colonising new areas. This lack of adaptation may mean the species will continue to develop in areas unsuitable for their survival. The species lacking a response to climate change in flowering date or latitude are: Alder, Barren Strawberry, Bird Cherry, Bird's Nest Orchid, Blunt-flowered Rush, Broad-leaved Dock, Cocksfoot, Common Rockrose, Common St.John's Wort, Corn Mint, Gipsy-wort, Great Water Dock, Great Yellow-cress, Greater Knapweed, Hairy Woodrush, Hawthorn, Hoary Ragwort, Lesser celandine, Lesser Stitchwort, Marsh Foxtail Grass, Meadow-sweet, Opposite-leaved Golden Saxifrage, Ploughman's Spikenard, Raspberry, Rowan, Salad Burnet, Sanicle, Self-heal, Slender St.John's Wort, Sneezewort, Stemless Thistle, Stinging Nettle, Sweet Violet, Whitebeam, Wild Privet, Wintercress, Yew, Yorkshire fog. 

Dr Tatsuya Amano from the University of Cambridge explained “Our study indicates that the two well-known plant responses to warming climates are linked in a complementary manner. We believe that this finding helps us understand the complex consequences of climate change for biodiversity.” 


For more information: 

http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1779/20133017.short?rss=1 Tatsuya Amano, Robert P. Freckleton, Simon A. Queenborough, Simon W. Doxford, Richard J. Smithers, Tim H. Sparks and William J. Sutherland, 2014, Links between plant species’ spatial and temporal responses to a warming climate http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/news/press-releases/nc-study/ Woodland Trust Press Release


Source of Report

http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/news/press-releases/nc-study/

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25. Jun 2014
Reported by Amber Roberts, St Helens

Keywords

climate change (en)

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